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Activities to help improve your Child’s Handwriting Skills at home

Tips for Using Board Games as Writing Games

Pulled from the Inspired TreeHouse

1. Try carrying games over between multiple sessions.

Using board games as handwriting games typically makes the game take a bit longer than it normally would.  Rather than rushing, try making note of where you left off and then pick up the same game again across multiple sessions.

2. Silent play can make things more fun and increase opportunities for writing.

Making a rule that there is no talking during the game is a great way to get kids’ attention – they love doing familiar tasks in a different, more interesting way!  And when kids aren’t allowed to talk, it means that they have to write their answers or write things down to communicate.  It’s a win-win!

3. Assign a scorekeeper!

Younger, less experienced, or struggling writers may need a different role during these games.  Can they act as scorekeeper – writing down all of the players’ names and keeping track of points?

4. Use turn-taking to your advantage.

While one person is taking his turn, the person who went before him can be writing her word/answer.  This way, game play is continuous and the whole group is never waiting for one person to write.

Tips for Using Board Games as Writing Games

1. Try carrying games over between multiple sessions.

Using board games as handwriting games typically makes the game take a bit longer than it normally would.  Rather than rushing, try making note of where you left off and then pick up the same game again across multiple sessions.

2. Silent play can make things more fun and increase opportunities for writing.

Making a rule that there is no talking during the game is a great way to get kids’ attention – they love doing familiar tasks in a different, more interesting way!  And when kids aren’t allowed to talk, it means that they have to write their answers or write things down to communicate.  It’s a win-win!

3. Assign a scorekeeper!

Younger, less experienced, or struggling writers may need a different role during these games.  Can they act as scorekeeper – writing down all of the players’ names and keeping track of points?

4. Use turn-taking to your advantage.

While one person is taking his turn, the person who went before him can be writing her word/answer.  This way, game play is continuous and the whole group is never waiting for one person to write.

Contact GTS if you’d like to inquire about handwriting help for your child.